CD-R Action: What is it for?

Hello folks,

I plan to burn a great many M4a files from Windows Vista onto CD-R and I want to avoid any unpleasant surprises about disk readability and/or broken file names. One of the actions supplied with Mp3Tag is CD-R.mta but I am puzzled by it. The list of characters to replace (see attached screen shot) does not correspond to what I see in CD-R standards for file names.

The action does not enforce the original ISO 9660 standard from 1988 (8.3 file names with only letters and numbers), although I doubt that anyone uses that standard now. It also does not follow the Joliet CD-R specification from 1995, which shows only these characters as prohibited:

\ / : * ? ;

None of those are included in the CD-R action. And, as far as I can tell, the current CD-R standard (UDF) does not prohibit any characters. Of course, Windows file name restrictions apply to Windows users, but even that list is quite different from the list in CD-R.mta. So, does anyone know what problem this action was intended to fix?

It would be helpful if MTA files contained comments to explain such things. Is there a comment prefix character so that I can add notes?

PS: the search engine here will not allow me to search for "CD-R.mta", so I apologize if my question has already been answered....


It seems that no one knows what this is for or whether comments can be added to MTA files.

I have some suggestions for Mp3tag:

1.) The ability to add comments to MTA files would be very useful.

2.) The MTA files supplied with Mp3tag need to be reviewed, and new ones added.

3.) Over the years, many useful actions have been posted in this forum. The best of these could be packaged into a single zip file for download. Each MTA file could contain the author's name and a brief explanation of what the file does.

I think that these additions would enhance an already wonderful resource. The download would be a great resource for people who are new to scripting in Mp3Tag.

You can mis-use the action "Format value" this way ...

[#0]
T=5
F=!
1=This is a comment which describes what this MTA will do.

[#1]
T=5
F=!
1=This MTA holds some explanations how a comment can be stored along with other useful scripting statements.

[#2]
T=5
F=MY_DEMO_TRACK
1=%TRACK%

[#3]
T=5
F=!
1=The previously statement is a simple "Format value" statement.

[#4]
T=5
F=!
1=The following statement is a simple "Format value" statement.

[#5]
T=5
F=MY_DEMO_TITLE
1=%TITLE%

[#6]
T=5
F=!
1=That''s all folks.

[#7]
T=9
F=!

... or another example ... with the advantage that Mp3tag does not touch the additionally ini items when editing the actiongroup in the actions dialog ... with the disadvantage that those comments have to be added from outside of Mp3tag using a text editor.

[#0]
T=5
F=MY_DEMO_TRACK
1=%TRACK%
!1=This is a comment which describes what this MTA will do.
!2=This MTA holds some explanations how a comment can be stored along with other useful scripting statements.
!3=The previously statement demonstrates just a simple "Format value" statement.

[#1]
T=5
F=MY_DEMO_TITLE
1=%TITLE%
!1=This statement demonstrates just a simple "Format value" statement.
!2=That's all folks.

DD.20110211.1802.CET

As always ... if Mp3tag has some thing not already palatable, then you have to build some thing for yourself. The functions $validate(), $replace(), $regexp() can help to replace forbidden characters by allowed characters.

As a starting point to find out what characters are allowed in a file system on an optical disk, search and read articles on Wikipedia, for example:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_9660

Once you have found out the best solution ever ... it would be nice to share your effort with us.

DD.20110211.1833.CET

Hello DetlevD,

Thank you very much for your tutorial on adding comments! Your text editor method will be fine for me.

Thanks also for the link. However, ISO 9660 is rarely applicable now. All burners sold for PC use today use some version of Universal Disk Format (UDF) for both DVD-R and CD-R: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UDF_File_System

It appears that UDF accepts all standard Unicode characters. Despite this, it is common for burning programs to reject some common ones. For example, Nero 10 removes apostrophes (both the straight and the curly types) when they occur in file names or in tags in a dropped playlist. I have no idea why. There may well be other characters that cause a problem with Nero. If anyone here has a list, that information would be very welcome. My research is ongoing, and yes, I will share what I find....

Thanks also for your many, many helpful posts here!